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April 26, 2013 / JayMan

The HBD of HBD realists – where I get my readers

Where my readers are from:

Readership Blog

The top views are from the Anglosphere, with the U.S. in the lead, which is to be expected since my blog is in English. Except, oddly, for New Zealand. What’s the matter Kiwis? Don’t like that I contradict your hero James Flynn? 😉

The countries with the next most views are, interestingly, Germany, Sweden, and Finland. Germans, Swedes, Finns, what’s up?

Comments from readers in those countries on the situation there would be much appreciated.

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31 Comments

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  1. AK / Apr 26 2013 2:10 PM

    The countries with the next most views are, interestingly, Germany, Sweden, and Finland. Germans, Swedes, Finns, what’s up?

    Sweden is as good as an English-speaking country; even the bus drivers there know it to a very good level. Germans too have very good English proficiency, though not quite to the same extent as Swedes.

    • Anonymous / Apr 26 2013 4:06 PM

      Hum, not really, from my experience Germans are no more fluent in English than most other Europeans. If anything, they are less, and this is very simple to understand: the larger the country, the more important it’s native language, the larger his domestic cultural production and economic market, the less incentive to learn foreign language. So u will have much better luck speaking english in small(er) european countries than in Germany, France, Spain or Italy.
      So there is probably something special with Germany. Could simply be sheer number (80 10⁶)

    • AK / Apr 26 2013 5:00 PM

      When I was in Germany, the people who couldn’t speak English tended to be the elderly. All the young people and most of the middle-aged could. I could not say the same of France.

      The results of the Eurobarometer poll on language fluency in EU countries tends to confirm this: http://ec.europa.eu/public_opinion/archives/ebs/ebs_386_en.pdf

      56% of Germans say they speak English well enough to have a conversation in it. This compares to 39% of French, 34% of Italians, and 22% of Spaniards.

      This is less of course than in places like the Netherlands or Sweden where English language proficiency is pretty much universal, but Germany makes up for it in superior numbers.

  2. EddyJedi / Apr 26 2013 2:19 PM

    I’d say the list probably mirrors that of many mainstream websites on whatever mainstream topic. It’s basically a reflection of the numbers of internet users in any given developed country.
    And Flynn is American, not Kiwi, even though he has been based there for a long time.

    • JayMan / Apr 26 2013 5:06 PM

      My next project is to break it down per capita, or internet connection per capita.

  3. ADS / Apr 26 2013 4:21 PM

    Swede here,

    I think I came to this blog from glpiggy. Might have been westhunter or isteve though.

    To the extent that the number of Swedes doesn’t simply mirror the proportion of Internet users, I’d say that there’s quite a bit of interest in HBD here, since we’re currently making our entire country into a study of fundamental human differences with semi-disastrous results. Since there’s NO official discussion tolerated on the subject and online Swedish discussion on race, etc is dominated by semi-retarded nazis there isn’t much choice but to look to the anglosphere for sensible discussion on the subject.

    The debate climate here is really, really, really, really bad. I don’t know if you watched the Norwegian documentary about social scientist crazies, but the situation here is much worse. We’ve got those kind of nutjobs as idealogical commisars at every level of societal bureaucracy and most people (except of course for immigrants) have internalized the nonsense.

    • JayMan / Apr 26 2013 5:00 PM

      Thanks for the insight. Yes I know the Brainwash series (see the “HBD Fundamentals” page at right).

      That’s sad that things are that way there. Indeed, it is tragic, in the Classical Greek sense.

    • Anonymous / Apr 27 2013 10:32 AM

      Yes, it is quite sad. And interesting, for those living outside, as a kind of live distopia….And a distopia that is very often mentioned as an example to follow in my own country (Belgium). I am especially interested in seeing if scandinavian rabid form of feminism will collapse, maintain its power, or get worse. Personally I hope for a collapse, else it would be bad omen for the rest of Europe.

    • JayMan / Apr 27 2013 10:51 AM

      Sweden a dystopia? Nah, I’d say it’s more like a tragic uptopia…

      Personally I hope for a collapse, else it would be bad omen for the rest of Europe.

      A wake-up call of some sort is probably ideal.

    • Staffan / Apr 28 2013 7:34 AM

      As a Swede I fully agree, although the anti-immigration party has risen from nothing to around 10 percent in recent polls so there is a reaction. It’s funny how this party is more popular with people of foreign extraction than it is with Swedish women. But at least some sort of reaction. I don’t think people in other countries realize just how conformist Sweden is.

    • Anonymous / Apr 29 2013 5:07 AM

      Aren’t the more interesting dystopias utopias gone bad? To me they are, and they feel so much more realistic that simple distopias where everybody (except very few rulers) disagree and suffer from it. For example, even if I found 1984 more revolting (and quite disturbing at the end, I even remember reacting physically like before a fight – quite moving stuff and well desserving it’s cult book status), brave new world is better imho as a dystopia (while i find it not as well written).
      Or more recent, GATACCA is more an utopia gone bad (for some) than dystopia.
      Sweden feel the same imho: it is not a brutal dictature where the life of everyone is controled by a small ruling elite….but it is so conformist that it is oppressive for a large minority of the population who would be ready to sacrifice a little bit of security and egality of outcomes, for more liberty and egality of treatment.

  4. Niall / Apr 26 2013 8:17 PM

    There are lots of people from the Angloshphere teaching English here in South Korea, and then you have USFK. Sorry to say it but, it’s probably not actual Koreans who are reading your blog here.

    Keep up the good work!

    • JayMan / Apr 27 2013 12:02 AM

      Thanks. I believe it.

    • anon666 / Apr 27 2013 12:47 PM

      I’d still be surprised that 326 western English teachers are interested in HBD topics. Are these statistics for *unique* viewers?

    • JayMan / Apr 27 2013 1:01 PM

      I’ll have to get back to you on that.

    • Niall / Apr 27 2013 8:10 PM

      There are about 22,000 foreign English teachers here and about 28,000 USFK stationed here, so it’s a pretty big pool of internet users. The funniest HBD-related thing I came across here was when a few expat iSteve readers living in Korea proposed in one of Steve’s comments threads that they get together somewhere in Seoul. I live too far from the capital, so I didn’t take them up on it, but the thought of an iSteve meetup in Korea was pure gold.

    • JayMan / Apr 27 2013 8:36 PM

      Jared Taylor once intimated that race denial isn’t a problem in Japan. Is that also the case, in your experience, in SK?

    • Niall / Apr 27 2013 10:46 PM

      Yes, it’s similar here, especially out on the street and among older Koreans (and Korea has a lot of old people). What’s interesting to me is how the youth will interpret western bromides on race. SK has the third highest number of international students in absolute terms after China and India, each of which has more than a billion people, so that’s a ton of Koreans studying abroad per capita. Most of those Korean students study in the west and then return home with at least some exposure to western cliches.

      I’ve seen on numerous reading comprehension tests in my own workplace block paragraphs showering the most empty-headed encomium on race denial and multiculturalism, which the students have to read, digest and repeat if they want to move up in life. Not sure if they’re absorbing it long term or just for the mid term.

      So we’ll see how Korea fares relative to Japan in the long run. The former seems to follow the U.S. more closely than the latter.

    • JayMan / Apr 28 2013 12:40 PM

      Interesting. Thanks for the info.

    • JayMan / May 3 2013 10:15 AM

      No, looks like these are views unfortunately. On an average day, I get about 2 views per visitor. Don’t think it separates unique views over the course of multiple days though.

  5. anon666 / Apr 27 2013 12:45 PM

    Can anybody comment on the situation in the German-speaking countries? I’ve spent a better part of the last year trying to master the language because I like that part of the world, as well as some of the satelite states to the east, where Hochdeutsch serves as a useful Handelssprache. It doesn’t seem that the debate is nearly as dominated by multiculturalists, nurturists and relativists as in Sweden, as Thilo Sarrazin’s book “Deutschland schafft sich ab” is reported by Wikipedia as being the highest sold politically-themed German-language book in a decade. Of course, he was heavily reproached from many corners, but he received plenty of interview and debate time in the German media, in addition to support from a number of other German intellectuals like Norbert Bolz.

    I’d be interested in hearing anybody’s impression of the political climate in the region, as well as any recommendation of German-language writers/intellectuals who are worth reading, aside from Sarrazin and Bolz.

    • Anonymous / May 2 2013 3:59 AM

      I think the situation in germany is pretty the same as in other couintries of the west: hbd beeing a taboo in political discourse, feminismn is official politics(e.g. with a quota for female managers of private companies drawing nearer) and immigration seen as solution to the demographic problem.
      Sarrazin made it through the thought police(msm) only, because he is by default from the political left. A by-analysing-the -facts converted liberal(in the american sense of the word).A right wing politician would have been easily silenced by accusation of beeing a nazi.
      However Sarrazin had some minor flaws in his reasoning and so he could be attacked by the usual suspects. And now the discussion has faded away, without changing the political climate.

      For your request of literature I recommend the widely unknown scientist Peter Mersch.

      – Evolution Zivilisation und Verschwendung: Über den Ursprung von Allem

      In this book he shows a generalized theory of evolution witch is useful especially to describe
      eusocial species, including human beings.

      – Die Familienmanagerin: Kindererziehung und Bevölkerungspolitik in Wissensgesellschaften

      Here Peter Mersch proposes a solution for the demographic problem of the west( quantity and
      quality of future generations of human beings): Make it a possible profession for well-educated
      women(a proxy for high IQ women) to give birth and raise their children,in order to reestablish
      bigger families with high-potential offspring.

      Unfortunatly the books are only available in german at the moment as far as I know, so some knowledge of german is necessairy.

    • Simon Hambacher / May 6 2013 7:40 AM

      please also see my other post more downwards.
      i am quite convinced that the situation in most western countries is very much the same, like anonymous said. maybe the discussion in germany concerning HBD is even more backwards than in countries of the anglosphere, because germany lacks the colonial tradition.
      sarrazin does not really believe in HBD, he only mentions richard lynn in one footnote hided at the very end of his book.
      if you are thinking about immigrating to a germany speaking country take switzerland not germany:-)

  6. Anonymous / Apr 28 2013 2:25 PM

    It’s sad that there aren’t enough public officials and billionaires paying attention to HBD from third-world countries with either sizable smart fractions, e.g. India, or billions of dollars in oil money, e.g. Dubai.
    I’ve recently been in Dubai, and to be honest the population there seriously NEEDS some IQ-enhancement. If I had been an adviser to a local sheikh, I would’ve recommended investing at least $1 billion in BGI, with BGI in return performing the first embryo IQ selections on the local arab population. That would be a far better use of their money than building empty useless skyscrapers. What use are skyscrapers when there are no companies to fill them?

    • Anonymous / Apr 30 2013 12:21 AM

      “I’ve recently been in Dubai, and to be honest the population there seriously NEEDS some IQ-enhancement. ”

      Islamic cousin marriage over hundreds of years.

  7. Simon Hambacher / May 6 2013 7:35 AM

    i am a regular reader from germany (so please excuse my bad english), i like this blog very much. for me there were two mainaspects which made me think about HBD
    a) on the street you an unbelievable high share of men/women relationsships where the man is of subsaharan, especially westafrican ancestry which would include westafricans like nigerians, people from ghana and so on or african americans. because of that a huge and fast growing share on newborn babys in germany have a “black” father and a “white” mother. it always struck me that you see very seldom subsaharan african women with caucasian men and never eastasian men and caucasian women. this is a strong pattern, but you are not allowed to talk about that in public. everybody knows that the market for sexual relations is not a equal one, and everybody knows that this has ceonsequences (demography is destiny) but still no one talks about that
    b) when watson was “watsonized” (a word i learned in this blog:-)) a few years ago i couldn´t believe how everybody had the same opinion and no one dared to question the orthodox stance on those things. in general it is very strange that institutions, newspapers or people who I know to be very intelligent seem to turn off their thinking the very moment it comes to race, and easily believe in very questionable concepts like lewontins ideas.

    all in all in germany there is very little room for thinking and talking about HBD, actually in don´t know any german websites which promotes thinking about HBD like westhunter, hbd chick, steve sailer, khans gene expression, stephen hsu, john derbyshire and this blog do it.

    • Anonymous / Jul 5 2013 5:55 PM

      I live in West-berlin and work in East berlin and i dont see this. most blacks i see are in black-black relaionship. where do you live?

  8. Natalie / May 7 2013 12:14 AM

    Now, don’t take the lack of Kiwi readers all personal like (do you like my attempt at Americanised English? Total lol!). It’s just down to the fact that we’re a tiny, tiny country. Australia, our neighbour, and probably one of the smallest Anglophone nations in terms of population at 18 or so million, has 12 million people MORE than New Zealand. We’ve just hit the 4 million mark – we just don’t have the numbers to send hundreds of thousands to your blog. Although if we DID I’m sure we’d turn up and read. 😀

    • JayMan / May 9 2013 12:56 PM

      Now, don’t take the lack of Kiwi readers all personal like (do you like my attempt at Americanised English? Total lol!)

      It’s glorious! 🙂

      It’s just down to the fact that we’re a tiny, tiny country. Australia, our neighbour, and probably one of the smallest Anglophone nations in terms of population at 18 or so million, has 12 million people MORE than New Zealand. We’ve just hit the 4 million mark – we just don’t have the numbers to send hundreds of thousands to your blog.

      Oh indeed, I know you have a tiny country. :p But NZ sends fewer readers per capita than places like Finland. But, I did make a post about Finland and not one about New Zealand, even though NZ shared #1 spot of least corrupt countries with Finland.

      There, that make you feel better? 🙂 😉

    • JayMan / May 9 2013 1:01 PM

      Thanks for the insight. 🙂

  9. Sideways / May 10 2013 9:25 PM

    NZ has a higher readership rate than the UK.

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